Films Synopsis

2017 Arkhaios Film Festival Films Synopsis-p3

Friday October 20, 2017 at 3:55pm
The Grand Masters of the Chauvet Cave
Director: Christian Tran, Producer : Quark, Arte France, France, 2015, 52 min.

A team of artists, visual artists and prehistorians was appointed to oversee the creation of the Pont d’Arc Cavern, a reproduction of the Chauvet Cave.

The film follows the Catalan painter Miquel Barcelo as he observes and comments on the work of the artists as they create the reproductions. The paintings and drawings of the Chauvet cave – made thirty six thousand years ago and discovered twenty years ago in the south of France – are the oldest human artistic expression to date. Their strength and modernity changed radically all the ideas we had on prehistorical art.

The creation of an important museum devoted to the reproduction of the works allows a close-up on the paintings, the drawings and the engravings. The film enables us to understand their incredible techniques and feel their intact emotional power.

AWARDS and SCREENINGS:
Audience Favorite Award - International Festival of Archaeological Film - Rovereto, Italy, 2015.
FIFA Festival International du Film sur l'Art - Montréal, Canada 2016. Festival du Film d'Archéologie d'Amiens, France 2016. International Festival of Science Documentary Films of Olomouc, Czech Republic 2016. Festival Artecinema, Napoli Italy 2016. Rencontres d'archéologie de la Narbonnaise 2016. Festival International du Film Archéologique de Bordeaux – ICRONOS 2016. Festival du film de Saint-Séverin, QC Canada 2016 .

Friday October 20, 2017 at 5:10pm
American Premiere
Bog Bodies
Director: Rébecca Boulanger, Producer : Scientifilms, France, 2015, 26 min.

Since the 17th century, more than a thousand mummies, mostly from the Iron Age between 800 and 100 BC, have been discovered in the bogs of northern Europe.

This acidic, moist and organic soil promotes the conservation of bodies, hence their exceptional state of conservation, which allows scientists to better understand these civilizations, which have left no written traces.

The men of the peat bogs are bodies offered to the gods, the only witnesses in Europe of human sacrifices, men of the people, but also kings. (Les Docus, 2016)

AWARDS and SCREENINGS:
Best Short Film Award, Amiens Archaeology Film Festival, France, 2016.

Friday October 20, 2017 at 5:40pm
American Premiere
The Southern Campaign of the American Revolution, Backcountry Battles
Director: William Ira Richardson, Producer : SCETV, USA, 2016, 57 min

The Southern Campaign was critical in determining the outcome of the American Revolutionary War, yet the South’s importance has been downplayed in many historical accounts. South Carolina ETV (SCETV), The National Park Service (NPS), The Sons of the American Revolution, and The Self Family Foundation collaborated in producing an educational project that tells the stories and impacts of the historically important Southern Campaign battles.

The war was already underway in the Up Country long before the fall of Charleston. The Southern Campaign project begins in 1780, as battles and skirmishes from Charleston to Ninety Six culminate in events leading to the British surrender at Yorktown, Virginia.

The project explores some of the roles of women and children in the fight for the backcountry, the role of African Americans in the war, loyalist values and immigrant patriotism.

ABOUT THE DIRECTOR: During his 30+ years at ETV, Richardson has produced and directed live statewide television programs as well as other programs produced for local and statewide broadcast. Some examples are the 3 program Carolina Stories, Ghosts and Legends of South Carolina series, and The Mapping of Kosciuszko’s Tunnel.

Saturday October 21, 2017 at 1:05pm
Britain’s Pompeii: A Village Lost in Time
Director: Sarah Jobling, Producer : 360 Production,  Arte France, United Kingdom, 2016, 69 min.

This film follows a team of multidisciplinary scientists who conduct excavations in England in an ancient Bronze Age village, renamed "British Pompeii".

Thanks to the quality of preservation of the village buried in the marshes for thousands of years, archaeologists have discovered perfectly preserved dwellings with all their contents, illuminating a very little documented period of life in Great Britain 3000 years ago.

The excavations at Must Farm also help to clarify the links between the European populations during the Bronze Age. The villagers of Must Farm practiced a flourishing agriculture on a large scale, suggesting that they could trade with other European peoples and buy materials such as metal and glass.


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